Free Shipping on Every Online Order Over $25. Shop Now
Camellia Brand

Tastes Like Home

The Camellia Bean Blog

The “Holy Trinity” – The Base of New Orleans Cooking

Trinity

Ask any New Orleanian what the Holy Trinity is, and though the city’s dominant Catholic heritage might imply otherwise, they’re sure to say onions, bell pepper, and celery. These three aromatic vegetables are the undisputed workhorses in the New Orleans kitchen; almost every traditional recipe calls for their merged flavors to serve as its underpinning.

Creole étouffées, gumbos, sauce piquantes and stuffings. Cajun jambalayas. New Orleans red beans and rice. Each of these dishes typically begins with the finely chopped trinity sautéed in a small amount of oil or fat – often the fat left from browning hot, smoked or andouille sausages or other seasoning meats in the skillet.

Heat breaks down these flavorful vegetables, releasing their trapped liquids onto the hot surface of the skillet. An intense flavor is developed as the water evaporates, leaving behind residual sugars that caramelize the vegetables until a desirable richness is achieved, the intensity of which depends on the length of the sauté.

The result is a naturally concentrated and complex flavor and texture that New Orleanians pray they’ll never have to live without.

Categories: Bean Love
  • Micah

    Why did they choose Green bell peppers which are not ripe over red bell peppers which are ripe?
    Thanks!

    • Wdlands42

      Red bell peppers are preferred to get the green celery, white onions, and red pepper colors. If someone uses the green bell peppers, it is probably because they are more readily available or cheaper.

    • Kevin Smith

      Convenience for one. Basic simplicity for two. My “Trinity” varies depending on my mood, taste and pockets are concerned. We all know as Louisianans cooking is a direct route to and from the heart, so its a matter of feeling. I may feel colorful and want to cook for a group of friends and family and want them to see how I’m feeling. That would constitute the usage of celery, red/green/yellow bell pepper and green/white/red onion. More Joyful and spirited. If my target audience are children, why bother… green bell, celery and white onion will do it. If I’m cooking for myself it could be either or depending on the time constraints and affordability. Same with gumbo… you can tell how important or close of a friend you are by what you get and the size shrimp I use in my gumbo. If you are getting Colossal or Extra Large shrimp, I’m trying to impress you. You are either a supervisor or the in-laws. Small shrimp or means I really don’t care much… just had to make this gumbo to get you off my back. Medium shrimp usually means it’s just for me and my household or really close friends. My true friends… one’s that are allergic to shellfish get the chicken and sausage gumbo made in a smaller pot to the side. I usually make a smaller pot with okra also for those with that particular taste.

  • zeebraa

    SEEMS LIKE i ALWAYS USED GREEN ONION RATHER THAN WHITE ONIONS IN MY TRINITY. USED TO BUY IT AT THE STORE WHEN i WAS HOME BUT NOW i AM IN OREGON AND HAVE TO MAKE MY OWN. WHICH IS PREFERABLE WHITE OR GREEN ONIONS